2021/9/20  
Artist Yao Jui-chung documents 400 publicly constructed buildings now abandoned (2015/11/29)
其它新聞 Other News   
  • Lee Has Stroke
  • Laborers Support Tsai
  • Taipei mayor says food safety scandals will be greatest influence on upcoming election
  • Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship Competition aims at helping others
  • 英文 English 
    Artist Yao Jui-chung documents 400 publicly constructed buildings now abandoned (2015/11/29)

    It’s hard to believe publicly constructed buildings that are now idle cost taxpayers some NT$400 billion. These white elephants – known in Taiwan as “mosquito halls” – have attracted the interest of video artist Yao Jui-chung. Beginning in 2010 he led photography students in National Taiwan Normal University’s Fine Arts Department on a special mission to photograph all of these facilities. They have taken pictures of some 400 of these locations over four years.

    The entrance to the Taoyuan County’s Northern Exhibition Hall isn’t very inviting as the area is littered with garbage. This abandoned space sits adjacent to Taoyuan International Airport.

    This Ministry of Economic Affairs spent more than NT$200mn to plan and construct this exhibition hall. It thought people would be attracted to seeing planes taking off and landing. As big as three soccer stadiums, the facility opened in 1995 but closed after just three years in operation.

    Yao Jui-chung
    Photographer
    This was built about 20 years ago as it was expected to be part of the Taoyuan Aerotropolis. It was to be used for exhibitions, but it only hosted one or two exhibitions before going completely idle.

    In Dayuan Township, many public facilities have gone idle, such as this coastal recreational area service center. The Taoyuan County government spent NT$14 million to build and landscape the facility to transform it into the shape of a whale. A tank was also brought in to attract tourists, but the facility was failed.

    Here we can see corrosion on the doors and windows and mildew on these walls and abandoned equipment.

    Yao Jui-chung
    Photographer
    The government hopes that these large projects will lead to local prosperity and help level out the urban-rural divide. But after investing in the facilities, they find they don’t have the management skills to accompany these projects. This is why many of these spaces have gone empty. There simply isn’t the manpower or talent to run them or operate them over the long term. That’s where the problem lies.

    Here we see Yao with his camera carefully photographing this mosquito hall. He’s personally drawn to ruins. Prior to this project, he was actually a well-known Taiwanese contemporary artist.

    Here we see Yao transforming a traditional landscape painting by replacing the brush with a pen, creating his unique style.

    Yao Jui-chung
    Photographer
    Ancient people worked with a brush, which was one of their necessary tools of daily life. But now people have different tools such as this pen, which more closely resembles modern life.

    Many are wondering how a contemporary artist who is usually removed from society could develop such an interest in “mosquito halls" and seek to draw public interest in them.

    Yao Jui-chung
    Photographer
    When my daughter was born, I found that we had left her a society full of problems. I wanted to see if we make a small effort to help her remove some of the obstacles her generation will face.

    In 2010, working as a part-time lecturer in the National Taiwan Normal University Fine Arts Department, Yao Jui-chung, mobilized his students to collectively photograph and document all these deserted public projects.

    Liao Wan-ting
    NTNU Student
    Most people’s impression of art is that it’s disconnected from society, but the professor hopes that art can intervene. I feel this is very meaningful.

    Yao Jui-chung
    Photographer
    When you give students an assignment today they won’t go to the location. Instead they simply search the Internet for its location and read a few related articles. I emphasize to my students that they must actually visit the site to get a deeper impression.

    For four years, Yao Jui-chung has worked with more than 200 students personally, visiting some 400 mosquito halls in Taiwan. These works have been assembled into a four-part series “Mirage: Disused Public Property in Taiwan”.

    All of the photos in the book are black and white, suggesting the dark side of idle publicly constructed buildings.

    Yao Jui-chung
    Photographer
    Illustrations can quickly produce a sense of shock in (people) and we added some text to list the competent authorities and what construction budget was allocated and which year it was built. Afterwards, we really don’t know who was in charge of the project but at least we can send it as a reference for the government to review.

    Not only did the topic become a series of publications for Yao, but photos from the project went on to win the international audience award at the 2014 Singapore Asian Art Competition.

    Yao Jui-chung
    Photographer
    Taiwan doesn’t face this problem alone, as the whole world has this problem. Everyone agrees that we don’t know how to solve it, so many foreign audiences may encounter the same concern.

    The work produced by Yao and his students has touched on an important issue which is resonating with international audiences. The ultimate goal of this project is to make the government face up to this vexing problem of idle public spaces and the need to invigorate them with new life.

    中文 Chinese  
    蚊子管藝術

    您可能無法想像,全台灣閒置的公共建設空間,也就是所謂的蚊子館,至少就浪費了四千多億的人民納稅錢。攝影藝術家姚瑞中,從2010年開始,透過一堂在師大美術系的攝影課,帶領學生展開名為《海市蜃樓》的踏查計劃。四年來,他們以第一手拍攝的方式,揭發四百多處「蚊子館」。

    入口處,招牌並不醒目,堆滿垃圾,這裡是桃園的北區綜合展示館,鄰近桃園機場。

    這個展示館是由經濟部耗費兩億多規劃建造,以欣賞飛機起降為賣點,約三個足球場的大小,1995年開館,只是啟用不到三年,就封館。

    [[姚瑞中 攝影家]]
    “大概20年前左右就蓋了,當初是為了配合航空城的規劃,這個地方主要是作為展覽規劃用途,早期辦過一兩檔展覽之後,就完全閒置了”

    在大園鄉,閒置的公共設施不少,濱海遊憩區服務中心,桃園縣府花了1400萬興建,鯨魚造景加上坦克車要吸引觀光人潮,但並不成功。

    從鏽蝕的門窗爬入屋內,看到的是斑駁的牆壁,和一個個廢棄的器材。

    [[姚瑞中 攝影家]]
    “政府的思維,是希望透過大型建設來推動地方的繁榮,去平衡城鄉差距,但是投入硬體建設之後,卻沒有軟體措施可以搭配,所以空有一個巨大的館舍,卻沒有人或是人才去營運,甚至去長期經營,這個才是問題所在”

    帶著攝影鏡頭,仔細拍攝蚊子館的是攝影家姚瑞中,拍廢墟只是他的興趣,真正的身分其實是台灣知名的藝術家。

    用硬簽字筆取代毛筆,將古畫改造成現代山水畫,是姚瑞中獨創的畫風。

    [[姚瑞中 攝影家]]
    “古代人用毛筆,因為那是他們日常生活的必備工具,現代人必備的工具,就是這種筆,所以用這種筆畫,是比較接近我們現代生活的常態”

    只是印象中的藝術家應該與世無爭,姚瑞中怎麼會開啟這場「蚊子館」革命。

    [[姚瑞中 攝影家]]
    “我女兒出生之後發現,我們好像留給她一個社會是充滿很多問題的,我們是不是有可能用微薄的力量,去幫她清除一些障礙。”

    於是2010年,在師大美術系兼課的姚瑞中,結合學生集體行動,進行台灣閒置公共設施的踏查計畫。

    [[廖婉婷 師大學生]]
    “大多數人對美術的印象,可能是跟社會其實是脫節的,但是老師希望藝術能夠介入社會,我覺得很有意義”

    [[姚瑞中 攝影家]]
    “現在的學生,你叫他寫作業,他根本不去現場,他用網路地圖找,好像就到那邊了,再網路搜尋隨便幾篇文章,就說他做訪查了。我必須要強調,親歷現場的一種感覺,對學生的衝擊是更大”

    四年來,姚瑞中帶了200多名的大學生親自走訪全台超過400處的蚊子館,集結成四本圖鑑式專書《海市蜃樓》。

    書中的照片,全部都用黑白呈現,暗示閒置空間的黑暗面。

    [[姚瑞中 攝影家]]
    “圖鑑是可以(讓人)在很短的時間之內,產生一種震憾的感覺,配合簡短的文字做案例說明,列出它的主管機關,跟它的開銷經費以及興建年代。集結出來之後有沒有人管,不知道,但我們總是要寄給政府參考一下”

    不僅出書,姚瑞中還帶蚊子館照出國比賽,2014年獲得新加坡亞州藝術獎國際觀眾票選獎。

    [[姚瑞中 攝影家]]
    “意義就是說,這個問題不是台灣問題,是世界問題,大家都有同感,只是大家不知道怎麼解決,所以很多外國的觀眾,可能會心有戚戚焉的感覺

    姚瑞中和學生的踏查,引起國際共鳴,不過他們最終的目的,還是希望政府能正視這個問題,活化這個動輒千萬,甚至上億的閒置空間。

    關於民視 常見問題 如何收看民視 意見信箱

    © 2009 FTV All Rights Reserved 版權所有‧盜用必究 Designed by FTV
    地址:244 新北市林口區信義路99號   觀服電話:(02)8601-8601 服務時間:週一至週日09:00-21:00   傳真:(02)8601-3955

    本網站使用 cookie 與其他技術為您提供更好的使用體驗, 請閱讀我們的的隱私權政策,通過使用我們的網站,表示您確認並同意我們的政策。